Volume 2, Issue 4, December 2018, Page: 75-78
Prevalence of Drug Eluting Stent Restenosis and Its Correlation with Culprit Coronary Artery
Anthony Matta, Cardiovascular Department, Notre-Dame des Secours University Hospital, Jbeil, Lebanon
Joseph Bou Assi, Faculty of Medicine, Holy Spirit University of Kaslik, Kaslik, Lebanon
Alexandre Kharma, Cardiovascular Department, Notre-Dame des Secours University Hospital, Jbeil, Lebanon
Nicolas Moussallem, Cardiovascular Department, Notre-Dame des Secours University Hospital, Jbeil, Lebanon
Received: Aug. 20, 2018;       Accepted: Sep. 18, 2018;       Published: Nov. 29, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ccr.20180204.11      View  22      Downloads  13
Abstract
In-Stent Restenosis (ISR) remains a significant problem for the treatment of coronary artery disease (CAD). Our study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence of significant restenosis of drug eluting stent (DES), as to its correlation with the culprit coronary artery. A retrospective study was conducted on 924 consecutive patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for DES implantation and who were followed-up by cardiac coronarography within 1 year. Cardiac coronarography films were reviewed for the presence or the absence of significant ISR, and for detection of the underlying culprit coronary artery. 2x2 tables and Chi square test were used. P value<0.05 was considered significant. The revision of cardiac coronarography films of follow-up for 924 included angioplasties showed significant ISR in 165 DES out of the 1494 implanted ones. Statistical analysis estimates the prevalence of DES restenosis at 11%. Taking into consideration the different coronary arteries, it is respectively: 8.79% in Left Anterior Descending (LAD) where ISR was found in 63 stents out of the 654 inserted ones, 11.38% in circumflex (Cx) where ISR was found in 42 stents out of the 327 inserted ones, and 14.7% in right coronary artery (RCA) where ISR was found in 60 stents out of the 342 implanted ones. A negative significant relationship was detected between the prevalence of ISR and LAD coronary artery lesion in opposition to a positive significant relationship between the prevalence of ISR and RCA lesion. The prevalence of significant ISR of DES is 11% and it is significantly higher in stents implanted in RCA as compared to stents implanted in Cx and LAD with statistical evidence of significant correlation between the prevalence of ISR and the involved culprit coronary artery.
Keywords
In-Stent Restenosis, Drug Eluting Stent, Coronary Artery Disease, Percutaneous Intervention
To cite this article
Anthony Matta, Joseph Bou Assi, Alexandre Kharma, Nicolas Moussallem, Prevalence of Drug Eluting Stent Restenosis and Its Correlation with Culprit Coronary Artery, Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research. Vol. 2, No. 4, 2018, pp. 75-78. doi: 10.11648/j.ccr.20180204.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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