Volume 4, Issue 3, September 2020, Page: 80-84
Clinical Profile of Patients with Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response During Treadmill Stress Test and Its Correlation with Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease
Angelica Dela Cruz, Section of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Philippine General Hospital, University of the Philippines, Manila, Philippines
Dioscoro Bayani, Section of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Philippine General Hospital, University of the Philippines, Manila, Philippines
Arnolfo Tomas, Section of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Philippine General Hospital, University of the Philippines, Manila, Philippines
Elmer Jasper Llanes, Section of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Philippine General Hospital, University of the Philippines, Manila, Philippines
Received: May 10, 2020;       Accepted: May 28, 2020;       Published: Jun. 8, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.ccr.20200403.11      View  58      Downloads  22
Abstract
This study determined the prevalence and clinical profile of patients with Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response (EBPR) during Treadmill Exercise Test (TET) and its correlation with traditional risk factors of Coronary Artery Disease (CAD). Methodology: This is a cross-sectional study performed in Out Patient Department of Philippine General Hospital of patients 19 years old and above. Clinical profile was obtained and TET parameters including blood pressure at rest, during exercise and recovery period were determined. Results: There were 226 patients included in the study. The mean age is 52 and 121 (53.5%) were females. There were 108 (47.8%) with hypertension, 55 (24.3%) were smoker, 73 (32.3%) with dyslipidemia, 1 (0.4) with hyperuricemia, 31 (13.7) with diabetes, 51 (22.6%) with family history of CAD and 2 (3.9%) with history of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT). The prevalence of EBPR is 20.21%. Those with EBPR are usually female 31 (81.6%) and likely hypertensive 22 (57.9%). Female sex and abnormal BMI were the significant predictors of EBPR with p-value of 0.001 and 0.042 respectively. Conclusion: The prevalence of ESBR is 20.21%. The EBPR is strongly correlated with female sex and abnormal BMI. Further screening of these patient and aggressive management by adapting new HTN guidelines might help to reduce cardiovascular risk.
Keywords
Treadmill Exercise Test, Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response, Coronary Artery Disease
To cite this article
Angelica Dela Cruz, Dioscoro Bayani, Arnolfo Tomas, Elmer Jasper Llanes, Clinical Profile of Patients with Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response During Treadmill Stress Test and Its Correlation with Risk Factors for Coronary Artery Disease, Cardiology and Cardiovascular Research. Vol. 4, No. 3, 2020, pp. 80-84. doi: 10.11648/j.ccr.20200403.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Reference
[1]
Braunwalds Heart Disease A textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine 10th edition.
[2]
Jagmeet Et Al, Blood Pressure Response During Treadmill Testing as a Risk Factor for New-Onset Hypertension, The Framingham Heart Study.
[3]
Mehmet Akif Duzenli et al: Blunted heart rate recovery is associated with exaggerated blood pressure response during exercise testing.
[4]
Kokkinos P, Pittaras A, narayan P, et al. Exercise capacity and blood pressure associations with left ventricular mass in prehypertensive individuals. Hypertension. 2007; 49: 55–61.
[5]
Nicolaos T. et al. Exaggerated Exercise Blood Pressure Response and Future Cardiovascular Disease, 2013.
[6]
MH Criqui, WL Haskell, G Heiss, HA Tryoler, P Green, CJ Rubenstein: Predictors of systolic blood pressure response to treadmill exercise: The Lipid Research Clinics Program Prevalence Study.
[7]
MichealDoumas et al. Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response to Exercise: Will It Ever Be Ready for Prime Time? The Journal of Clinical Hypertension. August 2015.
[8]
Chi Young et Al, Exagerrated Blood Pressure Respinse to Exercise is Associated with Augmented Rise of Angitensin II During Exercise. Journal of American College of Cardiology 2008.
[9]
De Lima SG at al: Exaggerated blood pressure response during exercise treadmill testing: functional and hemodynamic features, and risk factors.
[10]
Kumanyika S. Special issues regarding obesity in minority populations. Ann Intern Med. 1994; 119: 6550–6554. [PubMed].
[11]
O’Donnell CJ, Ridker PM, Glynn RJ, Berger K, Ajani U, Manson JE, Hennekens CH. Hypertension and borderline isolated systolic hypertension increase risks of cardiovascular disease and mortality in male physicians. Circulation. 1997; 95: 1132–1137.
[12]
Sae Young Jae et al; During Treadmill Testing as a Predictor of Future Hypertension in Men: A Longitudinal Study; American Journal of Hypertension, Volume 28, Issue 11, 1 November 2015.
[13]
Matthews CE, Pate RR, Jackson KL, Ward DS, Macera CA, Kohl HW, et al. Exaggerated blood pressure response to dynamic exercise and risk of future hypertension. J Clin Epidemiol. 1998; 51: 29–35. doi: 10.1016/S0895-4356(97)00223-0. [PubMed] [CrossRef].
[14]
Lund-Johansen P. Hemodynamics in early essential hypertension. Acta Med Scand 1967; 181 (suppl 482): 1–101.
[15]
Miyai N, Arita M, Miyashita K, Morioka I, Shiraishi T, Nishio I. Blood pressure response to heart rate during exercise test and risk of future hypertension. Hypertension. 2002; 39: 761–766. doi: 10.1161/hy0302.105777. [PubMed] [CrossRef].
[16]
De Lima SG at al: Exaggerated Blood Pressure Response to Dynamic Exercise and Risk of Future Hypertension.
Browse journals by subject